The Effect of Linear Energy Transfer, Particle and Energy Fluence on Renal Surface Area during Abdominal CT Scan

Authors(8) :-Issahaku Shirazu, Cyril Schandorf, Y. B. Mensah, S. Y. Mensah, Theophilus Sackey, Ernest Kojo Eduful, Mark Pokoo-Aikins, Theresa Bebaaku Dery

The quantities that determine the relative image noise level by either increasing or reducing its value are photon quality (kVp) and photon quantity (mAs). This study is to determine the effect of LET, energy and particle fluence on the renal surface area during abdominal CT scan. The method involve extracting three exposure parameters from image data using MVL DICOM application software including: kVp, mA and scan time. The kVp or the photon peak energy which is applied in the A-P direction during abdominal CT scan was used to estimate linear energy transfer. While the particle fluence and the energy fluence were estimated from the effective mAs and the kVp on the total renal surface respectively. The effective mAs were estimated by dividing the mAs by the average pitch factor of approximately 0.813. In all the examinations, the average protocol setting in terms of exposure time and kilovolts peak were 500s and 120keV respectively. While the average protocol in all the centers recorded a mean effective milliamp second (mAs) of 59.27 mAs and tube current of 94.22A. The influence of these parameters on abdominal scan depends on the scan time, scan scope, the size of the renal surface area (RSA) which has varied values. The effects of effective mean mAs per unit mean renal surface area, described as mean effective particle fluence were 1.32mAs/cm2 and 1.50 mAs/cm2 for male and female respectively. The energy fluence, which is the photon energy per unit renal surface area estimated to have a mean value of 4.02 keVcm-2 and 4.51 keVcm-2 for male and female respectively. In addition, the maximum and minimum variations of all the measured parameters. The LET, which described the lost in photon energy as it traverses across the renal tissues in the A-P direction was estimated, with a mean value of 2.60 keV/Ám and 2.67 keV/Ám for male and female respectively. The maximum and minimum LET values were 4.49 keV/Ám and 1.90 keV/Ám for male and 5.26 keV/Ám and 1.98 keV/Ám for female respectively. The maximum measured values were below the critical LET values estimated to be between 15 to 20 keV/Ám. These estimated risk parameters were used to predict the effect on abdominal and kidney tissues using the various modeled equations.

Authors and Affiliations

Issahaku Shirazu
Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute, Medical Radiation Physics Center, Accra, Ghana
Cyril Schandorf
Graduate School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences, University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana
Y. B. Mensah
University of Ghana Medical School, Department of Radiology, Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra Ghana
S. Y. Mensah
University of Cape Coast, School of Agriculture and Physical Sciences Faculty of Physical Sciences, Department of Physics, Cape coast, Ghana.
Theophilus Sackey
Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute, Medical Radiation Physics Center, Accra, Ghana
Ernest Kojo Eduful
Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute, Medical Radiation Physics Center, Accra, Ghana
Mark Pokoo-Aikins
Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute, Medical Radiation Physics Center, Accra, Ghana
Theresa Bebaaku Dery
Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, Radiological and Medical Sciences Research Institute, Medical Radiation Physics Center, Accra, Ghana

Photon Quality, Photon Quantity, Image Noise, LET, Particle Fluence, Energy Fluence.

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Publication Details

Published in : Volume 3 | Issue 3 | May-June 2017
Date of Publication : 2017-06-30
License:  This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Page(s) : 671-677
Manuscript Number : IJSRSET1733144
Publisher : Technoscience Academy

Print ISSN : 2395-1990, Online ISSN : 2394-4099

Cite This Article :

Issahaku Shirazu, Cyril Schandorf, Y. B. Mensah, S. Y. Mensah, Theophilus Sackey, Ernest Kojo Eduful, Mark Pokoo-Aikins, Theresa Bebaaku Dery, " The Effect of Linear Energy Transfer, Particle and Energy Fluence on Renal Surface Area during Abdominal CT Scan, International Journal of Scientific Research in Science, Engineering and Technology(IJSRSET), Print ISSN : 2395-1990, Online ISSN : 2394-4099, Volume 3, Issue 3, pp.671-677, May-June-2017.
Journal URL : http://ijsrset.com/IJSRSET1733144

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